A time travelling beat with a penchant for booze and music. And shiny things.

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 199 notes

we-are-star-stuff:

Why are all planets spheres?
The myth that the Earth was flat persisted far longer than it should have. Philosophers and scientists suggested the Earth was round as far back as Pythagoras, or perhaps even further, and Eratosthenes even calculated its circumference with decent accuracy in the second century BC. It went on for centuries more, ultimately culminating in that most basic satisfying piece of evidence: the photos of the Earth as seen from space. Not even the most scientifically illiterate person could now doubt the facts. Earth is a sphere.
But why is the Earth, like all other planets, a sphere? Not to be evasive, but the simplest answer is: because they’re planets. When trying to come up with a mass threshold to differentiate planets from smaller bodies like asteroids, one of the primary rubrics is whether the body is massive enough to hold a spherical shape. So, there’s a giveaway: the answer is related to mass - and the most obvious force related to mass is, of course, gravity.
The reason planets are spherical is because the mass of the whole body creates a gravity well that is theoretically centered on the mass-center of the body itself. An irregularly shaped protoplanet, say with a lobe of heavy material sticking out in one direction, might have its gravitational center pulled away from the physical center of the shape. Over millions and billions of years, though, the strong pull down in all directions evens out those bumps.
The constituents of Earth might seem solid, but they are malleable under so much strain, and can flow like putty. In essence, gravity slowly deforms a planet to turn the gravitational center into the physical center. On a long enough timeline, the slow, even pull down the gravity well compresses a planet down to the most compact distribution around the center - in other words, a sphere.
Asteroids are often very oddly shaped with multiple lobes or jutting arms. This is because they are too small to create enough gravity to compress themselves down into a ball. Compared with the internal forces that hold matter together, gravity is very weak. A body must grow very large to exert enough gravity to overcome those forces. Many comets are much closer to spherical, however, because it takes so much less force to change the shape of ice than of rock.
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we-are-star-stuff:

Why are all planets spheres?

The myth that the Earth was flat persisted far longer than it should have. Philosophers and scientists suggested the Earth was round as far back as Pythagoras, or perhaps even further, and Eratosthenes even calculated its circumference with decent accuracy in the second century BC. It went on for centuries more, ultimately culminating in that most basic satisfying piece of evidence: the photos of the Earth as seen from space. Not even the most scientifically illiterate person could now doubt the facts. Earth is a sphere.

But why is the Earth, like all other planets, a sphere? Not to be evasive, but the simplest answer is: because they’re planets. When trying to come up with a mass threshold to differentiate planets from smaller bodies like asteroids, one of the primary rubrics is whether the body is massive enough to hold a spherical shape. So, there’s a giveaway: the answer is related to mass - and the most obvious force related to mass is, of course, gravity.

The reason planets are spherical is because the mass of the whole body creates a gravity well that is theoretically centered on the mass-center of the body itself. An irregularly shaped protoplanet, say with a lobe of heavy material sticking out in one direction, might have its gravitational center pulled away from the physical center of the shape. Over millions and billions of years, though, the strong pull down in all directions evens out those bumps.

The constituents of Earth might seem solid, but they are malleable under so much strain, and can flow like putty. In essence, gravity slowly deforms a planet to turn the gravitational center into the physical center. On a long enough timeline, the slow, even pull down the gravity well compresses a planet down to the most compact distribution around the center - in other words, a sphere.

Asteroids are often very oddly shaped with multiple lobes or jutting arms. This is because they are too small to create enough gravity to compress themselves down into a ball. Compared with the internal forces that hold matter together, gravity is very weak. A body must grow very large to exert enough gravity to overcome those forces. Many comets are much closer to spherical, however, because it takes so much less force to change the shape of ice than of rock.

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17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Path of the Soul with 340 notes

Source: opticallyaroused

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from The pleasure of burning with 649,718 notes

Source: t3chn0ir

17th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Δ S > 0 with 1,214 notes

robertkazinsky:

Film Meme: male characters (6/9)

I’m afraid. I’m afraid, Dave. Dave, my mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m a…fraid. - HAL 9000

Source: robertkazinsky

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from The pleasure of burning with 570 notes

rad-king:

♕

rad-king:

Source: marcedith

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Always Aroused with 528 notes

Source: italianlady2

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from I N S P I R Λ T I Θ N D I Λ R Y with 125 notes

zarah-abraham:

Desert Dreamer

zarah-abraham:

Desert Dreamer

Source: gypsylolita

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Pagan Love Fest with 17 notes

paganlovefest:

Viktor Safonkin – Gone out Sun

paganlovefest:

Viktor Safonkin – Gone out Sun

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from L V N U with 3,302 notes

cistro:

Mount Etna (Valley Of The Ox I) Sicily 

cistro:

Mount Etna (Valley Of The Ox I) Sicily 

Source: cistro

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Always Aroused with 15,768 notes

Source: VISUALECHOESS

17th April 2014

Audio post reblogged from Retrospective with 33 notes - Played 169 times

genre-less:

Thin Lizzy - Whisky In The Jar

Source: genre-less

15th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Little Red with 472,793 notes

Source: blowsive

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Fuck My Feelings. with 7,128 notes

Source: e4rleb1rd

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from ☯☯☯ with 283,390 notes

Source: afterthesmoke

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from mountain's majesty with 10,092 notes


brutalgeneration:

(by Jocelyn Catterson)

brutalgeneration:

(by Jocelyn Catterson)

Source: Flickr / jocelynmarie